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SALT. And the 40 + Foods That Replenish Electrolytes




It is impossible for a person today to acquire all his mineral needs from food because our soils have become so deficient. Hundreds of years of farming the soil, combined with the effects of pesticides, herbicides, and air and water pollution, have slowly drained the soil of its vital elements.


Below is an article from Mind Body Green that outlines exactly what is happening to our soil:




Below is a list if minerals and what foods are high in them! So many of our bodily functions rely on adequate mineral absorption; and electrolytes help to hydrate us especially in the Summer. If you have ever experienced a Charlie horse in the middle of the night like I have.. you’ll want to read this!!


Calcium


Many of us grew up hearing the commercials that milk “does a body good” because it’s rich in calcium. It’s true that dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese) are a solid source of calcium, but there are other healthy options:

  • Leafy green vegetables—Kale, Bok choy, spinach, collard greens, etc.

  • Broccoli

  • Beans, chickpeas, lentils

  • Soybeans, edamame, and tofu

  • Almonds and almond milk

  • Brazil nuts, walnuts, pistachios, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts

  • Seeds—chia, sesame, poppy, celery, flax

  • Some fruits—Figs, blackcurrants, blackberries, raspberries, apricots, kiwi, oranges, pineapple

  • Amaranth

  • Oatmeal

  • Salmon and sardines

Magnesium


Getting enough magnesium can help with hundreds of bodily processes—headaches, muscle fatigue and soreness, cramps, and even bowel movements. Good food sources of magnesium include:

  • Leafy greens, especially kale, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens

  • Avocados

  • Nuts—almonds, cashews, peanuts, Brazil nuts

  • Legumes—lentils, beans, chickpeas, peas, soybeans

  • Seeds—pumpkin, chia, quinoa, flax

  • Whole grains

  • Some fatty fish—salmon, mackerel, halibut

  • Bananas

  • Dark chocolate (our personal favorite)

Chloride


Chloride is paired with sodium in salt (hopefully, it’s Real Salt!), so most people get the chloride they need in the salt they eat. Food sources of chloride include:

  • Tomatoes

  • Lettuce

  • Celery

  • Olives

  • Rye

  • Seaweed

Sodium


Poor sodium. It’s been unfairly villainized for so long that we often forget how vital it is to health. If you’re reading this, you know that all sodium is not the same. What matters is whether you get your sodium from natural, unrefined salt or highly processed table salt. But we digress. In addition to Real Salt, some healthy sources of sodium include:

  • Dairy

  • Eggs

  • Clams

  • Unprocessed meats

  • Celery

  • Beets

Potassium


Potassium is abundant in a wide variety of foods, but most Americans don’t get nearly enough. Why? Part of the problem is the modern, highly-processed diet. If you want to add more potassium to your diet, pick a few favorites from the list below and add them to your cart on your next trip to the grocery store:

  • Fresh fruit: avocado, watermelon, oranges, pomegranate, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew, apricots, grapefruit

  • Dried fruit: prunes, raisins, dates, apricots

  • Broccoli

  • Leafy greens such as spinach, Swiss chard, beet greens

  • Tomatoes

  • Starchy vegetables such as potatoes, yams, sweet potatoes

  • Squash, zucchini, cucumbers

  • Legumes—chickpeas, lentils, beans, peas, peanuts

  • Whole grains

  • Dairy—milk and yogurt

  • Unprocessed meat and fish

Enjoy incorporating these foods into your diet and remember to hydrate with clean (not tap) water!


In Health and Electrolytes,


Amanda

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